The Gambia: Obama’s Christmas and New Year Present to Jammeh

26 Dec
"I am not going to change that philosophy overnight because of foreign influence tagged to the bait of aid that is conditioned on the acceptance of alien cultures like homosexuality and unbridled freedoms that are not in line with our religious and cultural beliefs,” Jammeh said on Dec 31, 2013 (Photo Credit: SEYLLOU/AFP/2011)

“I am not going to change that philosophy overnight because of foreign influence tagged to the bait of aid that is conditioned on the acceptance of alien cultures like homosexuality and unbridled freedoms that are not in line with our religious and cultural beliefs,” Jammeh said on Dec 31, 2013 (Photo Credit: SEYLLOU/AFP/2011)

News in and around The Gambia have being somewhat bleak for human rights and social justice activists in recent

times. In August this year, the parliament passed a bill amending the criminal code introducing life sentence for

“aggravated homosexuality”.

The draft law prompted an international outcry from human rights organisations such as Freedom House,

Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch. President Yahya Jammeh considered one of Africa‘s most

vocal anti-gay leaders signed the bill into law later in October without any hesitation.

Some few weeks later, reports emerged of the mass arrest and detention of people on suspicion of being homosexuals. According to rights groups, up to four men, a 17-year old boy and nine women had reportedly been arrested on suspicion of committing homosexual acts.

Campaigns against Jammeh’s notorious human rights records have tighten over the period. By late November,

foreign affairs minister announced that the tiny West African country would sever all dialogue with the

European UnionBala Garba Jahumpa said that President Yahya Jammeh would not allow foreign nations to use

aid to impose policies on his government, a position Jammeh has repeatedly emphasised. The minister also rejected what he said were attempts by the bloc to use its aid budget to force Gambia to revoke a tough new law against homosexuality.

On 24th November, the US State Department issued its first response to the situation in The Gambia.

“We are dismayed by President Jammeh’s decision to sign into law legislation that further restricts the rights of

LGBT individuals and are deeply concerned about the reported arrests and detention of suspected LGBT

individuals in The Gambia,” a press statement noted.

Days later, hundreds of people joined in a pro government protest chanting anti homosexual slogans. The 9th

December protesters marched through the streets of Banjul, the capital denouncing the EU for withdrawing foreign

aid over the country’s new anti-gay law. In a “not-so surprising” move, resident Yahya Jammeh joined protesters, who held placards and banners reading,

‘Homosexuality is inhuman,’ ‘Even cows don’t do it!’ and ‘Homosexuality is forbidden in Islam.’

In the meantime, authorities have continued on their clampdown on gay people across the country. Few days ago t

hree men were arrested on allegations of committing homosexual acts. The identities of these people remain unknown.

In an unexpected move, the United States last Tuesday revoked The Gambia’s eligibility for US preferential

trade programme known as the African Growth and Opportunity Act (Agoa).A presidential proclamation announcing

the decision did not specify the reasons for declaring The Gambia and South Sudan  ineligible for Agoa benefits but

referred to general criteria of the programme.

The two major criteria for Agoa are that a country “does not engage in activities that undermine US national security

or foreign policy interests” and “does not engage in gross violations of internationally recognised human rights”.

The decision is effective 1st January 2015.

It is not clear as to what will be Banjul’s response to the announcement by Washington but it is almost certain

that Jammeh will not bow down to “remote” diplomatic pressures. Thus President Obama’s Christmas and

New Year’s present to President Jammeh will likely get all the attention it deserves in Jammeh’s New Year

address to the nation next week.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: